News & Events

8 posts in College News
| College News

Exploring wilderness in one of the lower forty-eight’s most untamed landscapes

The College of the Environment recently interviewed Environmental Studies students and faculty member Tim Billo to learn about the Wilderness seminar course (Landscape Change in the Pacific Northwest) he teaches each year. Students spend a week in the Olympic National Park and explore biological changes in the landscape as well as engage in discussion about human impacts on the environment. Read the full story. 

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Read more at the College of the Environment

| College News, Research

Climate effects on mountain rain and stream-rearing salmon, the value of stewardship volunteers, and more: this week’s College-published research

Each week we share the latest publications coming from the College of the Environment. This week, twelve new articles co-authored by members of the College of the Environment were added to the Web of Science, including research on the survival of steelhead trout, livelihoods and conservation in China, and more. Check them out!

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| College News, Research

Ocean upwelling becoming more intense with a changing climate

Our Washington coastline is one of the most prolific and productive in the world, teeming with abundant plant and animal life. In fact, much of entire U.S. west coast is the same, and we can largely thank a strong upwelling system for driving this bounty. New research published in Science has shown that upwelling in the eastern boundary current systems – meaning, the eastern edges of ocean basins across the globe where winds, currents, and geological formations create a prime environment for upwelling – has increased globally over the past 60 years. 

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Read more on the Los Angeles Times

| College News, Research

Flow experiments, cloud dynamics, extreme fires and more: this week’s College-published research

Each week we share the latest publications coming from the College of the Environment. This week, twenty-three new articles co-authored by members of the College of the Environment were added to the Web of Science, spanning topics from forestry to biogeochemical cycles to algal blooms and more. Check them out!

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| College News, Research

Demystifying lush landscapes of the ancient African Sahara

When thinking of rich green landscapes—ones where an abundance of rain keeps everything growing and vibrant, supporting water-loving wildlife like crocodiles and hippopotamus—the Sahara is hardly the place that comes to mind. Yet 6000 years ago, this would have appropriately described what has become the dry, thirsty landscape of the Sahara we know today.
The desert’s previous state of relative lushness has long been known by scientists and others. 

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| College News, Research

Using eDNA to help scientists monitor marine ecosystems

Marine plants and animals leave behind tiny markers of their presence, often in the form of skin cells that have been shed, damaged tissues, or waste products – and within that lies their signature DNA. From a sample of seawater, scientists can read that eDNA — that is, environmental DNA — and paint a picture of species diversity in specific ocean ecosystems, determine whether or not invasive species have landed in local waters, and even sharpen their ability to monitor ecosystem changes as is often required by law. 

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Read more at the Stanford Woods Institute

| College News, Research

Aerosol effects on Arctic climate, land use effects on ecosystem services and more: this week’s College-published research

Each week we share the latest publications coming from the College of the Environment. This week, twenty-two new articles co-authored by members of the College of the Environment were added to the Web of Science. Read about them here!

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| College News, Community

Shellfish center – named after UW’s Ken Chew – to tackle shellfish declines

Washington state’s newest shellfish hatchery – and the federal government’s only such hatchery in the region – has been named after long-time University of Washington faculty member Ken Chew, a professor emeritus of aquatic and fishery sciences. The Kenneth K. Chew Center for Shellfish Research and Restoration is housed at the Manchester Research Station operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration near Port Orchard. 

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Read more at UW Today